In Case of Emergency

If a child has severe symptoms of lead poisoning,: such as vomiting or seizures, get immediate help by calling 911. If a child is Suspected of Being exposed to lead, make an Appointment with the child's health care provider or county health department To have a blood test done.

For Homeowners

The Get the Lead Out! program helps homeowners protect their children from lead poisoning. Lead hazards can be fixed before children are poisoned. Becoming lead-safe is good for your home in many ways, such as new windows, new siding or fresh paint!

 


 

Do you live in the City of Grand Rapids?

Many of the homes in Grand Rapids contain lead hazards that put children at risk. The Get the Lead Out! program provides loans and/or coverage for the repairs needed to ensure safe and lead-free homes.

If you meet all of the requirements listed below, you may qualify for the Get the Lead Out! program.

 

Here's how homeowners qualify:

 

 

Here's what homeowners can expect:

 

Households without a lead-poisoned child

  • Up to $16,000 in repairs
  • 50/50 matching loan with no interest
  • Monthly payments as low as $50

Get the Lead Out!, through the City of Grand Rapids Lead Hazard Control Program, provides up to $16,000 in repairs for households in the Target Area without a lead-poisoned child. This includes paint repair, new windows and other lead hazard elimination practices. 

The costs are paid through a 50/50 matching loan with no interest. This means for every dollar you pay, the City of Grand Rapids considers it two. Monthly payments start as low as $50 and last for up to 10 years. Once you have paid off half the costs, your liability for the loan is released. 

Your home may also be eligible for additional free repairs for health and safety items based on a full-home assessment. Call for more information. 

 

Households with a lead-poisoned child

  • Up to $20,000 in repairs
  • Payments deferred and may be forgiven

Get the Lead Out!, through the City of Grand Rapids Lead Hazard Control Program, provides up to $20,000 in repairs for households with a resident child whose blood lead test is 5 ug/dL or higher (venous). This includes paint repair, new windows and other lead hazard elimination practices. 

Your home may also be eligible for additional free repairs for health and safety items based on a full-home assessment. Call for more information. 

 

How to Apply

Call Healthy Homes Coalition at (616) 241-3300 or complete this intake form and email it to candace@healthyhomescoalition.org. If you would like to get started on your application package, it can be downloaded here.

 

Do you live outside of the City of Grand Rapids?

 

Statewide

The State of Michigan’s Lead Safe Home Program offers lead removal to any Michigan household with a child whose blood lead level is at least 5.0.  Households without a lead-poisoned child may also qualify. Call the Michigan Lead Safe Home Program at (866) 691-5323 or download an application here.

 

City of Wyoming

Lead inspections and removal are included in City of Wyoming’s Homeowner Housing Rehabilitation Program. Affordable home improvement loans are available for low- to moderate-income households. See more details.

Qualifications:

  • Live in City of Wyoming
  • Household income below 80% AMI

Call (616) 530-7266 to request a loan from the City of Wyoming Planning and Development Department.

 

Other Kent County Areas

Kent County Community Development can help homeowners in the City of Kentwood and other communities throughout Kent County. The Kent County Housing Rehabilitation Program offers deferred payment loans and grants for hazard abatement, including lead removal. See more details and how the program works.

Qualifications:

  • Live within Kent County, outside of Grand Rapids and Wyoming
  • Household income below 80% AMI 

Call the Kent County Community Development Department at (616) 632-7410 to complete a pre-application process by phone OR submit a pre-application online.

 

Muskegon County

Muskegon County Land Bank Authority has a Lead Hazard Reduction Program. Call (231) 724-1259 to see if your household qualifies.

 

Did You Know...

The City of Grand Rapids' Lead Hazard Control Program provides assistance eliminating lead hazards.

News & Events

Kent County Lead Task Force Hears from Leading Specialists

Four experts in the area of lead poisoning provided detailed presentations to the Kent County Lead Task Force on Wednesday, February 15, 2017. Board Chair Jim Saalfeld formed the Lead Task Force in September 2016 to investigate the issue and seek solutions to lead poisoning in children. Healthy Homes Coalition Executive Director Paul Haan serves on the task force.


Governor Appoints Healthy Homes Coalition Executive Director to Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board

GRAND RAPIDS – Governor Snyder appointed Paul Haan, Executive Director of the Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan, and Grand Rapids Mayor Rosalynn Bliss to the newly formed Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board created by Executive Order on June 10.

“It is an honor to be asked to serve in this important role,” said Haan. “We have a 15 year history of effectively fighting childhood lead poisoning in west Michigan, and I look forward to leveraging that knowledge in service to all the children of Michigan. Our goal will be to help focus this work on solving the root environmental causes of lead poisoning, including lead-based paint, lead-laden soil, and tainted water. It’s not enough to just test and treat kids. We have to get at the source.”


Healthy Homes and KCHD Seek Answers to 30% Increase in Lead Poisoned Kids in GR in 2015

On March 14, 2016, the Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan and the Kent County Health Department (KCHD) spoke with representatives from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) to begin exploring why there was a 30% increase in the number of children with elevated blood lead test results in Kent County in 2015. In 2014 there were 470 children with blood lead levels ≥5.0 ug/dL* in Kent County. In 2015, that number rose dramatically to 610 children. The initial request on that day was to review historical data to identify potential abnormalities related to WIC testing sites in the City of Grand Rapids, geography (zip codes), and time of year (quarter).